Eat Like Jane Austen With Recipes From Her Sister-In-Law’s Cookbook (Press This! Gastro Obscura)

Here is your opportunity to cook Jane Austen style. Authors, it’s probably a wealth of information about household life and cooking for the era.

A kind-hearted spinster, passed over in her youth by a potential suitor, spends her life faithfully tending the hearth and home of her dear family and friends. She is content to toil as a housekeeper, unrecognized but for the praise of beloved companions. All the while, she keeps a detailed household book of handwritten recipes, from carraway cake to currant wine, that her family loves.

Source: Eat Like Jane Austen With Recipes From Her Sister-In-Law’s Cookbook – Gastro Obscura

A bit spendy but available on Amazon in hardcover for $44.90.  Peek through the kitchen window to experience day-to-day life at Chawton Cottage, the home where Jane Austen wrote and published her famous novels.

Martha Lloyd first befriended a young Jane Austen in 1789 and later lived with Jane, her sister Cassandra, and their mother at the cottage in Chawton, Hampshire, where Jane wrote and revised her novels. Eventually, Martha married Jane’s brother Francis Austen, making her an authority on day-to-day life in the Austen family.

Martha Lloyd’s Household Book is a remarkable artifact, a manuscript cookbook featuring recipes and remedies handwritten over thirty years. Austen fans will spot the many connections between Martha’s book and Jane Austen’s writing, including dishes such as white soup from Pride and Prejudice. Readers will also learn the author’s favorite foods, such as toasted cheese and mead. The family, culinary, and literary connections detailed in the introductory chapters of this work give a fascinating perspective on the time and manner in which both women lived.

Passed down through the Austen family, the Household Book offers unprecedented access into the family home. In this first facsimile publication, Martha’s notebook is reproduced in color, accompanied by a complete transcription and detailed annotations.

Bridgerton Glossary (Press This! Oprah Magazine)

Fans of historical romance are versed in the Regency language. It never occurred to me that since Bridgerton seen by the general public on Netflix would need definitions. This article defines terms such as promenade, facer, Ton, courses, with child, sire an heir, swoon, snuff, modiste, countenance, rake, duke, viscount, a diamond of the first water, and the dark walk. I hate to think the public doesn’t know the meaning of some of these words, but nonetheless, one must educate the masses.

Two romance novelists break down the show’s historical terms.  There was just one problem. Watching the drama, which is set in 1813 London, occasionally felt like translating a foreign language. From talk of the “ton” to notorious “rakes,” I was often confused by the characters’ Regency speak. But apparently if I read romance novels, I might not have mistaken a rake for a gardening tool instead of a man.

Source: Bridgerton Glossary – A Guide to Words Like Rake, Ton, Promenade

Blame Jane: Romance Novels 2019–2020 (Press This! Publishers Weekly)

What’s so great about Regency romances anyway?

Source: Blame Jane: Romance Novels 2019–2020

Another interesting article – Blame Jane! “The lack of realistic options for writing interesting heroines is where the Regency loses a lot of authors. The choice can feel stuck between anachronism—planting a modern sensibility into an historic setting—and gender politics that leave modern readers cold.”

True Story of Lady Whistledown’s Scandal Sheets in ‘Bridgerton’ (Press This! Town & Country

A history lesson on the gossip columns. Great read.

“Newspapers were plentiful during the Regency Era, with most of the stories published centering on politics, crime, fashion, infidelity, or royal doings,” says Geri Walton, author of Marie Antoinette’s Confidante and regular writer on 18th and 19th-century Europe.

Source: True Story of Lady Whistledown’s Scandal Sheets in ‘Bridgerton’

How much of Netflix’s Regency Romp Bridgerton is Historically Accurate? (Press This! Daily Mail)

The show’s producers claim, “The point was to take that Regency period as a foundation, and not betray it in any way, but we didn’t want to make it a history lesson.

I find it interesting that some readers will allow authors to take liberties in their stories when they don’t one-hundred percent reflect the norms of the historical eras in which their book is set. A few minor falsehoods are forgiven, and it’s the love story that captures the reader’s attention instead.

Other readers are purists at heart and want both — a historical romance that rings true to the era. I’ve read my fair share of reviewers who complain, using comments such as “the speech was too modern,” “badly written Regency novel, using contemporary slang,” “doesn’t seem Regency to me,” “a woman would never be left alone with a man,” “they would have never acted that way,” “not historical – check your facts,” “you address a duke as Your Grace,” etc. They find these mistakes distracting to the overall central love story.

How much of the series is fact, and how much is simply fiction? Read the fact-checks on just how accurate Bridgerton Netflix Series is below. It’s a history lesson. Of course, that raises a question.  Does Julia Quinn write historically accurate novels, or does she allow a bit of freedom in her storytelling?

The point was to take that Regency period as a foundation, and not betray it in any way, but we didn’t want to make it a history lesson.’ So, how much of the series is fact, and how much is simply fiction? Here FEMAIL fact-checks just how accurate Bridgerton really is…

Source: How much of Netflix’s Regency romp Bridgerton is historically accurate? | Daily Mail Online

Jane Austen’s Regency Women: A Day in the Life, Part 1 | Jane Austen’s World

Head on over to Jane Austen’s World for another informative blog post.

I find Jane Austen’s daily routines inspiring, don’t you? She was well-rounded and enjoyed a variety of activities to keep her body, mind, and spirit healthy and balanced. She wrote newsy let…

Source: Jane Austen’s Regency Women: A Day in the Life, Part 1 | Jane Austen’s World

Meet the Historically Accurate Mr. Darcy | Smithsonian

Not Colin Firth – Not Matthew Macfayden or any other.  Here’s an interesting take on what Mr. Darcy would have really looked like. Read more below.

Mr. Darcy, Jane Austen’s swoon-worthy, 18th-century aristocratic hero, has a sizzle that transcends time.  A team of experts on fashion and social culture offer their take on Jane Austen’s brooding hero.

Source: Meet the Historically Accurate Mr. Darcy | Smart News | Smithsonian

“Mr. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien; and the report which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand [pounds] a year.”