Romance is one of the most lucrative fiction genres, a billion-dollar industry featuring stories full of banter, courtship, and smoldering chemistry.  So how did an entire subgenre of literature spring up around a few thousand rich people who lived during the 1810s? Source: Why Are So Many Romances Set in the Regency Period? | JSTOR DailyContinue Reading

Fans of historical romance are versed in the Regency language. It never occurred to me that since Bridgerton seen by the general public on Netflix would need definitions. This article defines terms such as promenade, facer, Ton, courses, with child, sire an heir, swoon, snuff, modiste, countenance, rake, duke, viscount, a diamond of the first water, and the dark walk. I hate to think the public doesn’t know the meaning of some of these words, but nonetheless, one must educate the masses. Two romance novelists break down the show’s historical terms.  There was just one problem. Watching the drama, which is set in 1813 London, occasionally felt like translating a foreign language. From talk of the “ton” to notorious “rakes,” I was often confused byContinue Reading

Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, has written her first novel for adults, to be released by the leading romantic fiction publisher Mills & Boon.  Her novel Heart for a Compass is a fictional historical saga inspired by her great-great-aunt. Source: Duchess of York: From Budgie the Helicopter to Mills & BoonContinue Reading

The article linked below makes the point, “The Duke and I, was first published in 2000 – twenty years ago, well before woke culture, the #MeToo movement, and our growing understanding of consent and healthy gender dynamics.” We are back again to the conundrum that historical romance needs to stay pure to the times in which women lived, or we need to tweak the past so that it doesn’t offend those in the present. Recently I read a review for the Earl’s Well that Ends Well, a new release by Catherine Heloise, on another book website. I won’t go into the review itself but would like to focus upon a comment left by a reader. Perhaps it brings up a singular thought or one thatContinue Reading

“Quinn hopes the Netflix series might draw more attention to the genre.”  We can hope! Julia Quinn, the Seattle-based author of dozens of bestselling historical romance novels (whose real name is Julie Pottinger), is on the phone, remembering the moment she learned that her series of books about the Bridgerton family in Regency London was headed to the screen. Source: Seattle author’s ‘Bridgerton’ novels debut as Netflix series | Arts & Entertainment | lmtribune.comContinue Reading