“Quinn hopes the Netflix series might draw more attention to the genre.”  We can hope! Julia Quinn, the Seattle-based author of dozens of bestselling historical romance novels (whose real name is Julie Pottinger), is on the phone, remembering the moment she learned that her series of books about the Bridgerton family in Regency London was headed to the screen. Source: Seattle author’s ‘Bridgerton’ novels debut as Netflix series | Arts & Entertainment | lmtribune.comContinue Reading

So my recommendation to you: If you have read the books, try NOT to compare them. You can’t. They are completely different, except for the names of the characters and a vague sense that you are in a historical England. If you want to see the books brought to life on the screen, simply trade in your paperback for a Kindle. Source: Bridgerton on Netflix Has Very Little in Common with the Books – PasteContinue Reading

In the shows final seconds, the camera pans over to a single buzzing bee on a windowsill—but the scene lasted a bit too long, suggesting that the bug was alluding to something and wasn’t just an aesthetically pleasing image of an insect. We break down what the bee signifies below and how it hints at what’s to come for season two and Anthony Bridgerton. Source: The Bee in the Bridgerton Finale Could Hint at the Plot of Season 2 No news yet, but the speculation is out already. If there is a season two, I imagine it will be well over a year until release. (Still wish they’d do a season two of Sanditon.)Continue Reading

Julia must be extremely happy, as the release of Bridgerton – The Duke & I on Netflix, has soared many of her Bridgerton series books to the top-ten best sellers in the genre. In fact three of them, are on the entire best-sellers in Kindle eBooks. As of this post, Bridgerton: The Duke and I (Book One) is at #3, Bridgerton Collection Volume 1: The First Three is at #6, and The Viscount who Loved Me: Bridgerton is at #9. Congratulations, Julia!Continue Reading

Read more about the new Netflix Bridgerton series coming later this year based on Julia Quinn’s series.  Here are the cast and an interesting article, commenting on the casting versus reality in the historical romance genre. Talia Hibbert makes a good point.  Read below. “No-one cares that the historical romance genre is built on a throne of lies, because it’s bloody romance! The clue is in the name! These! Stories! Are! Romanticised! They are, like all fiction, mere constructs of reality based on the author’s perception of their audience’s desires. And that’s okay! Except, apparently, when it comes to people of colour.” Source: Race and Historical Romance, or: The Duke is Black, Now Deal With It. – Talia HibbertContinue Reading