The continuing conversation that the Netflix series is going to give a resurgence to the historical romance genre and hopefully give it more credit than it has received in the past. Bridgerton quickly became more than just an adaptation; it was also a challenge to destigmatize a genre that doesn’t wholly deserve the condemnation it’s received. Source: Revolutionising romance adaptations – PalatinateContinue Reading

Now this article gets it right about what historical romance is all about. Great article and worth the read! “By building a love story between the primary couple, one that is guaranteed to end ‘happily ever after’ or ‘happy for now,’ a romance novel not only provides escapism and the heart-pounding rush of vicarious passion, but a space in which to explore how romantic relationships can and should be, and how women can find fulfillment and happiness. And that means these stories have little to do with how the marriage market of Regency high society actually functioned; they’re about what readers — predominantly women — want to see in their lives today.” Source: ‘Bridgerton’ Isn’t Bad Austen — It’s An Entirely Different Genre | HuffPostContinue Reading

A show based on popular bodice-rippers gives an industry often dismissed as tawdry a much-needed embrace. The success of “Bridgerton” couldn’t have come at a better time for the romance industry, which has been struggling to retain its power in the publishing world. Recent years have marked a steady decline in print and ebook sales of romance novels, which went from more than 98 million units sold in 2012 to 41 million in 2020, according to NPD BookScan, whose figures do not reflect sales of self-published titles. Source: Netflix’s ‘Bridgerton’ Heats Up Romance – WSJContinue Reading

An in-depth article on what makes a rake in historical romance books. One thing positive about Bridgerton, it may give the historical romance genre new readership.  If you need a few good rakish reads, below are some suggestions. Today, a rake is common archetype for the witty hero of a historical romance novel—hence why the word appears in so many titles. Explains why Simon is the ultimate “lovable scoundrel.” Source: What Is a Rake? Why Bridgerton’s Simon Is the Ultimate DefinitionContinue Reading

When writing a book, authors are faced with decisions about what era to choose and what location to place the story. Since historical romance genre readers have their likes and dislikes, those decisions can influence sales. If you do a quick perusal of today’s best-selling historical romance books on Amazon Kindle, the top twenty are set in the following locations: 14 – United Kingdom, 2 – France, 3 – United States. An interesting article was published in USA Today/LIFE by By: Joyce Lamb | July 6, 2016, focusing on the fact that historical romance set outside of England can be risky business. (See Link Below) Settings in England continue to flood the marketplace. Perhaps that is why we are drowning in dukes and other titled aristocrat-related stories. Why, however, areContinue Reading

Female power. The new “alpha feminist” has arrived in the historical romance genre, becoming the new archetype of heroines presented to readers. The former heroines of eras past are now given twenty-first-century feminist empowerment by authors who are frustrated with the modern day female woes. Should such role reversals be found only in contemporary romance or is it all right to change the facts of historical romance in order to rewrite what we dislike about a woman’s place two hundred years ago? The bodice-ripping dukes may soon be replaced by the female dominant who acts quite differently than a woman in want of a husband would have done so during the Regency or Victorian eras. What are your thoughts about rewriting the historical aspect of historical romanceContinue Reading

Yesterday, I was feeling a bit loopy looking at old historical romance book covers. Have you ever thought about the cover poses in this genre?  If you look at the older books, I can imagine an ensuing backache and neck strain sustained if a shirtless man bent me over backward, while I lifted my naked leg up against his side.  Romantic?  I laugh at the faces of these ladies who often turn their head away and looked pained rather than seduced.  Of course, the windstorm is always blowing and the hair is flying around.  Do they make you go ouch or moan at the thought of the dominant male seducing you as our spine cracks? Have a bit of a chuckle with me on theContinue Reading

A rather interesting article on historical romance and the 1970’s term of Bodice Rippers, where books were all about sexually aggressive men taking weak women.  The author has a point about the former ideals in the ’70’s and ’80’s with repressed sexuality and the excitement these books produced. Nowadays, putting any type of forced sexual assault in an historical romance book is pretty much taboo among readers.  What are your thoughts? Derision for the genre might have as much to do with the bodice as the ripping. “While historical romance remains a major part of the romantic fiction genre today, experts agree that bodice rippers describe a short and specific moment in American publishing history that lasted only between the early 1970s and mid-1980s. “Continue Reading