Bridgerton’s Toxic Romance Fails Its Audience (Press This! Screen Rant)

The article linked below makes the point, “The Duke and I, was first published in 2000 – twenty years ago, well before woke culture, the #MeToo movement, and our growing understanding of consent and healthy gender dynamics.” We are back again to the conundrum that historical romance needs to stay pure to the times in which women lived, or we need to tweak the past so that it doesn’t offend those in the present.

Recently I read a review for the Earl’s Well that Ends Well, a new release by Catherine Heloise, on another book website. I won’t go into the review itself but would like to focus upon a comment left by a reader. Perhaps it brings up a singular thought or one that is currently running through the historical romance genre as readers deal with the past versus the present. Can readers find enjoyment in love stories that deal with toxic relationships and time periods that were oppressive to women? On the other hand, are more progressive readers going to demand that authors write novels in tune with today’s social expectations?

It’s an interesting argument that I think is going to split the genre going forward. There will be readers who want historical norms with romance, and others who want a modern romance version set in a historical setting. I think there can definitely be a blend of strong heroines in books going forward as discussed in a previous post, “Changing Heroines in Historical Romance.” All you have to do nowadays is read book reviews and focus on the five and one-star comments. The split of opinions on the subject is growing.

Talk to me! Do you mind reading about “toxic” relationships? Of course, characters should have flaws and the healing of couples can bring two together into healthy relationships. Do the oppressive eras that women dealt with rub you the wrong way, or are you able to handle it if the female character has a bit of spunk?

The problem with Bridgerton is not in how it portrays society but in how it portrays the relationship between Daphne and Simon. Beneath the veneer of romance, it’s a mutually manipulative and toxic relationship and one that shouldn’t be emulated. Unfortunately, it’s this sort of relationship that Bridgerton chooses to center, and in doing so, the show fails its modern audience.

Source: Bridgerton’s Toxic Romance Fails Its Audience | Screen Rant

Bridgerton on Netflix Has Very Little in Common with the Books (Press This! Paste)

So my recommendation to you: If you have read the books, try NOT to compare them. You can’t. They are completely different, except for the names of the characters and a vague sense that you are in a historical England. If you want to see the books brought to life on the screen, simply trade in your paperback for a Kindle.

Source: Bridgerton on Netflix Has Very Little in Common with the Books – Paste

Bridgerton is the Shiny Little Stocking Filler (Press This! The Independent)

On a positive note, we have this review. Four out of five stars. Keeping one’s perspective that, “Bridgerton is freed to be watchable fluff, with everyone involved refreshingly aware they are producing a piece of entertainment rather than A History of the English-Speaking Peoples.”

Shonda Rhimes’ historical romance series is all the better for putting entertainment before accuracy

Source: Bridgerton is the shiny little stocking filler we all need this Christmas – review

Review: Netflix’s New Drama is as Shallow as its Aristocrats (Press This! Vox)

I have a Google alert for anything new that comes up under the term “historical romance.”  The past four alerts have been jammed pack with news about Bridgerton and how it’s the next best thing on Netflix to tickle our romantic souls. This review, however, is a rather scathing one in the opposite direction.  Three days to release!  What will you think about this drama based off Julian Quinn’s popular series?

Bridgerton tries to put a fresh perspective on historical romance, but it forgets to be interesting. “As a huge fan of historical romance, I once longed for Netflix to make a lush, extravagant, twisty series in the vein of the books I loved. But now that it’s actually gone ahead and made one, I’ve found that I have to eat my words.”

Source: Bridgerton review: Netflix’s new drama is as shallow as its aristocrats – Vox