Bridgerton Glossary (Press This! Oprah Magazine)

Fans of historical romance are versed in the Regency language. It never occurred to me that since Bridgerton seen by the general public on Netflix would need definitions. This article defines terms such as promenade, facer, Ton, courses, with child, sire an heir, swoon, snuff, modiste, countenance, rake, duke, viscount, a diamond of the first water, and the dark walk. I hate to think the public doesn’t know the meaning of some of these words, but nonetheless, one must educate the masses.

Two romance novelists break down the show’s historical terms.  There was just one problem. Watching the drama, which is set in 1813 London, occasionally felt like translating a foreign language. From talk of the “ton” to notorious “rakes,” I was often confused by the characters’ Regency speak. But apparently if I read romance novels, I might not have mistaken a rake for a gardening tool instead of a man.

Source: Bridgerton Glossary – A Guide to Words Like Rake, Ton, Promenade