Author Julia Quinn’s Bridgerton series of novels is as delightful as the hit Netflix show adapted from it. Luckily, many viewers getting into the world of Bridgerton means quite a few new readers will head to their libraries or local bookstores to check out the books that inspired the show. Source: 10 Books Like ‘Bridgerton’ To Read When You Need More RomanceContinue Reading

I have a Google alert for anything new that comes up under the term “historical romance.”  The past four alerts have been jammed pack with news about Bridgerton and how it’s the next best thing on Netflix to tickle our romantic souls. This review, however, is a rather scathing one in the opposite direction.  Three days to release!  What will you think about this drama based off Julian Quinn’s popular series? Bridgerton tries to put a fresh perspective on historical romance, but it forgets to be interesting. “As a huge fan of historical romance, I once longed for Netflix to make a lush, extravagant, twisty series in the vein of the books I loved. But now that it’s actually gone ahead and made one, I’veContinue Reading

Bridgerton is one of the most-anticipated premieres of the season. Here are a few changes the Netflix adaptation can and should make to the source material. Source: How Bridgerton Can Avoid Outlander’s Mistakes | Den of Geek This is a must-read article that brings up key questions about source materials in books and adaptations to screen.  There will be deviations from Julia Quinn’s books in both race and sexual encounters.  There are also good comparisons to Outlander and Poldark, which were adapted to screen. It raises the question: Do you prefer historical romance to be accurate to the times in which people lived? OR Do you prefer that history be adjusted in historical romance to be in tune with today’s movements towards race equality, theContinue Reading

ViacomCBS agreed to sell the 96-year-old company in a deal that potentially creates a megapublisher.  A spokesman for Bertelsmann said Penguin Random House had lost market share in recent years and cited Amazon as a competitive threat to the overall book market. The combination of Penguin Random House and Simon & Schuster would be “below 20 percent,” the company said, citing data from the Association of American Publishers, an industry trade group. Source: Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster What does this mean for readers and authors?  Some of your favorite historical romance authors who are under Penguin contracts are Evie Dunmore, Mary Balogh, Amy Rose Bennet, and others.  From Simon & Shuster are Julia London, Meridith Duran, and others.  The pricey eBookContinue Reading

Just don’t call them “ugly.” Ellen Mirojnick on the Featheringtons’ dresses and historical accuracy. Netflix’s upcoming Regency drama Bridgerton promises plenty of sumptuous, tastefully designed gowns—and a few not-so-tastefully-designed ones. Source: Bridgertons on Netflix: Costume designer Ellen Mirojnick on the Featheringtons’ dresses and historical accuracy.Continue Reading

We get our first long-awaited look Shonda Rhimes’ first Netflix Original series, the romantic drama period-piece, Bridgerton. It’s a romantic, scandalous, and quick-witted series that celebrates the timelessness of enduring friendships, families finding their way, and the search for a love that conquers all. Source: High society and scandal go hand-in-hand in the first teaser for Netflix and Shonda Rhimes’ BridgertonContinue Reading

Recently while researching for my next novel, I did a little searching about the use of handkerchiefs.  Apparently, they had a language of their own just like fans.  This is definitely another interesting tidbit to add to your reality shelves while reading historical romance.  Have you found any books referencing the handkerchief flirt?  Enjoy. Flirting or coquetry remained an art form throughout the Georgian, Regency, and Victorian Eras, and handkerchiefs and flirting language became all the rage. Source: Handkerchiefs and Flirting Language – Geri WaltonContinue Reading

Reposting – worth the read if you love Georgette Heyer. Inquiring Readers, I discovered that Susanna Fullerton, President of the Jane Austen Society of Australia and Austen author, is as much of a fan of Georgette Heyer as I am, perhaps more. This delightful article compares and contrasts the writings of Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer.   Source: Jane Austen’s Influence on Georgette Heyer by Susannah Fullerton | Jane Austen’s WorldContinue Reading

Read about the pandemic-driven industry publishing woes. “Books that were bumped from spring and early summer are landing all at once, colliding with long-planned fall releases and making this one of the most crowded fall publishing seasons ever.”  You thought the market was crowded before?  As authors, visibility is a challenge that is even greater. Capacity issues at the two largest printing companies are among the factors creating havoc for authors and publishers. Source: Printer Jam: Serious Supply Issues Disrupt the Book Industry’s Fall Season – The New York Times Here is another article released as well.  590 new releases coming your way in various genres. Source:  590 books will be released on a single day next week — have publishers lost the plot?Continue Reading

Get your tissues ready. Half of the world is in tears, and when this hits PBS, the remainder of us will be crying in our tea. Read More:  ITV’s dramatization of the unfinished novel has offended the sensibilities of many Janeites. Alison Flood wonders if this makes sense Source: Sanditon: why are Austen fans so enraged by Andrew Davies’ ending? | Books | The GuardianContinue Reading

If you ever get to know me personally, you will soon find out that I love to analyze just about anything.  My quest for the day is what makes a great historical romance book? To answer that question, I turned toward one-star reviews left for books written by famous historical romance authors from the big publishers. You would think I’d be reading the five stars instead, but what is lacking in historical romance stories has my interest piqued. Here are the top-ten complaints I discovered. Predictable Plot.  Supposedly, these are books where you already know how it’s going to end after reading a few chapters.  In other words, there isn’t a plot twist or anything else interesting in between boy meets girl and the happilyContinue Reading

The perfect hero in historical romance. Is there one? What fantasy do readers want? In reality, as much as we are filled with fanciful and romantic thoughts, there probably isn’t a perfect man. Of course, it depends on how you define perfection. Like the variety of readers and their various tastes over heroines, there is no absence of criticism over the perfect male. Once again, I’ve strolled through the reviews of some best selling authors to find out what women are thinking. There are the usual complaints of women who dislike emotionally scared men (except for Fifty Shades, apparently), along with arrogant aristocrats and walking cardboard characters (boy that term gets used a lot). Frankly, I think women who look for the perfect hero wantContinue Reading

“A lady – beautiful word! — is a delicate creature, one who should be reverenced and delicately treated. It is therefore unpardonable to rush about in a quadrille, to catch hold of the lady’s hand as if she were a door-handle, or to drag her furiously across the room, as if you were Bluebeard…”  (The Habits of Good Society: By Unknown Author, originally published 1872. Copyright 2012 Forgotten Books). Recently on my author Facebook page, I’ve been posting videos of period dramas with romantic scenes of waltzes. Some of my favorites are from The Young Victoria, War & Peace (2016), Cinderella, and Crimson Peak. They look so romantic with women in gorgeous gowns being swung around the room by handsome men. According to The HabitsContinue Reading

The Dashwood Sisters.  Could there be anything more entertaining than these two women?  They are as different as night and day and both on a pursuit for husbands. Elinor bears everything with quiet decorum and sense. Marianne is outspoken and seeks the thrills of romantic fellowship with no sense at all. Okay, I’ll confess.  Sense and Sensibility is my favorite of Austen’s works. It was her first novel written in 1795 at the age of 19 and was accepted by a publisher and put into print in 1811 (at her own expense, I might add for all you indies out there).  Though I’m not an Austen expert by any means, I’m thankful for the many resources available online about her life and works from peopleContinue Reading