Book Reviews, Book Tours, Goodreads, http://schemas.google.com/blogger/2008/kind#post, Jane Austen Quotes, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility

Speak to Me of Love

I’m happy to report that we are registered with six book tour sites.  It is disappointing to see the lack of historical romances being promoted.  :wipes away tear:  I have put in for one novel for promo for the end of July. Of course, we have authors contacting us directly as well. Our reviewers are going to begin picking up titles on their own. If I can squeeze it in, I’m curious to read The Heiress of Winterwood.
I’ve been working on our Goodreads page, too, and visiting groups, collecting friends, and telling authors about our site.  While I was clicking from here to there, I glanced at my one lonely quote I had tagged on my page spoken by Marianne in the movie Sense and Sensibility:
 “Can he love her? Can the soul really be satisfied with such polite affections? To love is to burn – to be on fire, like Juliet or Guinevere or Eloise…”
Hmm…I pondered.  I know that there are many more quotes that move my heart, so I flipped over to the quote section and starting tagging all sorts of wonderful words. Goodreads has a nifty widget that I added to the sidebar that will rotate all sorts of great lines and quotes.
Of course, I favored Jane Austen’s work, only because her lines are so memorable and moving.  I think it might be fun as we start reviewing books if we take our favorite words of love and post them from the books we read.  I’ll have to put up that idea to my team.
Nevertheless, here are the quotes I so love from Austen’s work.  I hope you enjoy and feel free to comment with a few of your own memorable quotes from books!  Now, if we could only get the men in our lives to whisper such glorious words to melt our hearts.  

 “Dare not say that man forgets sooner than a woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you.” 
(Captain Wentworth – Persuasion)
“You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. 
Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever.”
(Captain Wentworth – Persuasion)
  “In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. 
You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.” 
(Mr. Darcy – Pride & Prejudice)
“I cannot make speeches, Emma,” he soon resumed; and in a tone of such sincere, decided, intelligible tenderness as was tolerably convincing.
“If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more.”
(Mr. Knightly – Emma)
“I come here with no expectations, only to profess, now that I am at liberty to do so, 
that my heart is and always will be yours.”
(Edward Ferrars – Sense & Sensibility)
 
Come back soon for more fun things before we start dissecting romance novels.
Your amiable host,
Vicki
Articles, Colin Firth, Darcy, Elliot Cowan, Fitzwilliam Darcy, http://schemas.google.com/blogger/2008/kind#post, Jane Austen, Matthew MacFayden, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen’s Leading Men – Part I – Fitzwilliam Darcy

Fitzwilliam Darcy. When he was conceived by Jane Austen and read by women everywhere before movies came along, I wonder how he was pictured in the minds of ladies. Of course, I’m sure that propriety forbade them to speak openly of such private imaginations. Well, let’s face it, as Jane said, a “lady’s imagination is very rapid” and who knows where it will lead besides matrimony.
As modern women, we are blessed with the advent of movies that have cast Darcy in the bodies of handsome actors. It’s here in our 21st century world when we read Pride & Prejudice, we’re no doubt picturing one of these men wearing a cravat and looking quite dashing in their period clothing.
I think it’s safe to say that most ladies love Colin Firth as the Darcy of their dreams. My tastes lean toward Elliot Cowan as my swoon-worthy Darcy. (Who you say? He played Darcy in the fictional world of “Lost in Austen.”) There was something about his appearance, characterization, and voice that made we go weak in the knees.
Perhaps, you enjoyed Matthew MacFadyen in the role, and our mothers and grandmothers kept their eyes on Laurence Olivier who moved women in 1940. There were others who made it on film to play the role in various adaptations.  No matter who your mind wanders to as Fitzwilliam, he’s still the arrogant aristocrat we find utterly fascinating.
However, our beloved Darcy does have his flaws. Before Elizabeth finally humbles him and puts him in his place, he really is annoying. The man never smiles. Of course, if you like aristocratic snobs and are one yourself, I’m sure you think he’s well behaved in his treatment of others. Wonderful Jane Austen pens the most powerful scene after Darcy declares his love for Elizabeth. After all, his love is a sacrificial gift in spite of Miss Bennet’s status in life.
“From the very beginning— from the first moment, I may almost say— of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.” 
Jane Austen’s colorful characters are worth their weight in gold.  Darcy, of course, is just one of the many leading men we can fantasize about in Austen’s works.  Is he my favorite among all of Jane’s creations?  No. Now that I’ve shocked you, you’ll just have to wait and see which man moves my heart or “floats my boat” as Amanda Price would say in Lost in Austen.

Enjoy your daydreams of Darcy; and do tell, who is your favorite!

Feeling most agreeable,
Vicki