Articles, Jane Austen Quotes

Speak to Me of Love

Romantic quotes.  Recently, I glanced at one quote spoken by Marianne in the movie Sense and Sensibility:

 “Can he love her? Can the soul really be satisfied with such polite affections? To love is to burn – to be on fire, like Juliet or Guinevere or Eloise…”

Hmm…I pondered.  I know that there are many more quotes that move my heart, so I flipped over to the quote section on Goodreads and starting tagging all sorts of wonderful words. Goodreads has a nifty widget that I added to the sidebar that will rotate all sorts of great lines and quotes.

Of course, I favored Jane Austen’s work, only because her lines are so memorable and moving.  Here are the quotes I so love from Austen’s work.  I hope you enjoy and feel free to comment on a few of your own memorable quotes from books!  Now, if we could only get the men in our lives to whisper such glorious words to melt our hearts.  

 “Dare not say that man forgets sooner than a woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you.”
(Captain Wentworth – Persuasion)

“You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope.
Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever.”
(Captain Wentworth – Persuasion)

  “In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed.
You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.”
(Mr. Darcy – Pride & Prejudice)

“I cannot make speeches, Emma,” he soon resumed; and in a tone of such sincere, decided, intelligible tenderness as was tolerably convincing.
“If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more.”
(Mr. Knightly – Emma)

“I come here with no expectations, only to profess, now that I am at liberty to do so, that my heart is and always will be yours.”
(Edward Ferrars – Sense & Sensibility)
 

Come back soon for more fun things before we start dissecting romance novels.

Your amiable host,
Historical Romance Books
Book Reviews, Book Tours, Goodreads, http://schemas.google.com/blogger/2008/kind#post, Jane Austen Quotes, Persuasion, Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility

Speak to Me of Love

I’m happy to report that we are registered with six book tour sites.  It is disappointing to see the lack of historical romances being promoted.  :wipes away tear:  I have put in for one novel for promo for the end of July. Of course, we have authors contacting us directly as well. Our reviewers are going to begin picking up titles on their own. If I can squeeze it in, I’m curious to read The Heiress of Winterwood.
I’ve been working on our Goodreads page, too, and visiting groups, collecting friends, and telling authors about our site.  While I was clicking from here to there, I glanced at my one lonely quote I had tagged on my page spoken by Marianne in the movie Sense and Sensibility:
 “Can he love her? Can the soul really be satisfied with such polite affections? To love is to burn – to be on fire, like Juliet or Guinevere or Eloise…”
Hmm…I pondered.  I know that there are many more quotes that move my heart, so I flipped over to the quote section and starting tagging all sorts of wonderful words. Goodreads has a nifty widget that I added to the sidebar that will rotate all sorts of great lines and quotes.
Of course, I favored Jane Austen’s work, only because her lines are so memorable and moving.  I think it might be fun as we start reviewing books if we take our favorite words of love and post them from the books we read.  I’ll have to put up that idea to my team.
Nevertheless, here are the quotes I so love from Austen’s work.  I hope you enjoy and feel free to comment with a few of your own memorable quotes from books!  Now, if we could only get the men in our lives to whisper such glorious words to melt our hearts.  

 “Dare not say that man forgets sooner than a woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you.” 
(Captain Wentworth – Persuasion)
“You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. 
Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever.”
(Captain Wentworth – Persuasion)
  “In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. 
You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.” 
(Mr. Darcy – Pride & Prejudice)
“I cannot make speeches, Emma,” he soon resumed; and in a tone of such sincere, decided, intelligible tenderness as was tolerably convincing.
“If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more.”
(Mr. Knightly – Emma)
“I come here with no expectations, only to profess, now that I am at liberty to do so, 
that my heart is and always will be yours.”
(Edward Ferrars – Sense & Sensibility)
 
Come back soon for more fun things before we start dissecting romance novels.
Your amiable host,
Vicki
Articles, Historical Romance Authors, Historical Romance Genre, http://schemas.google.com/blogger/2008/kind#post, Jane Austen Quotes, Mr. Darcy

Is the Historical Romance Genre Dying?

What a loaded question that happened to be on the Internet today.  A blog post was contributed by Jane Litte, the founder of Dear Author entitled, “We Should Let the Historical Romance Genre Die.”  A flash flood of comments were posted either agreeing or rebutting the idea.  The article was re-posted on one of my favorite sites, The Passive Voice, which generated many comments as well. It was a hot topic between readers and writers whether our Mr. Darcy-type characters are doomed to fade away into the distant past.
I commented on The Passive Voice that I don’t think the genre will ever really die, though the interest may wane because of the current trends in the marketplace. The vampire rage has paled, being replaced by the kinky millionaires and sex slaves in the bedchamber. Perhaps one day readers will want to return to the good old days for a bit of swashbuckling romance. I think new generations who fall in love with Austen’s work will want to read Regency-era stories. Of course, that genre is a bit cleaner than the 21st century, unless we start tying up and spanking Mr. Darcy for pleasure.
Frankly, authors need to make their stories more interesting, reach out to those readers who want that type of novel. Keeping a genre alive is a responsibility of not only a reader, but the author as well, who should have the incentive and imagination to bring a new flavor. If the target audience is getting bored, there must be reason behind it. Perhaps authors are just churning out too many cookie-cutter stories with not enough emotional impact to keep readers interested. 
I had an after thought, too, that historical romance is no easy gig for any author.  It’s one thing to write contemporary romance, sprinkled with a bit of research.  It’s entirely another daunting job to jump into a historical era and learn all about the speech, customs, dress, beliefs, and attitudes of the day.  Without research, historical romance is bland and just a story.  You can also get crucified in reviews from staunch protectors of the faith if you dare to vary from the historical norm. I don’t mind research, because I want to develop my characters in their true surrounding.  After all, some of the research is interesting!  I always thought French letters were just that — letters.  Little did I know…
Well, I assume that in a few days another controversial post will pop up somewhere in blog land.  In the meantime, what do you think?  Is the historical romance genre dying a slow death?  If so, what can we do to spice things up a bit, without making it raunchy in content?
I’ll leave with you another wonderful photo of a period dress to ponder upon while you’re thinking of your answer. I think women must have felt so feminine and beautiful.  Believe me, my jeans and sneakers just don’t do the trick. 

 “It isn’t what we say or think that defines us, but what we do.”
― Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
Purple wool, velvet and lace two-piece Worth dress, c. 1890
(Courtesy of Old Rags on Tumblr)