Articles, Historical Romance

Amazon Won Arbitration That Addresses The Six-Figure ‘Book Stuffing’ Kindle Scam

An interesting read about scams on the Kindle platform – book stuffing.  No, it’s not a book stuffed into a turkey cavity.  It’s something entirely different where cheating authors make $100K per month abusing the KDP platform.  Read how they scam you, the reader, and steal profits from honest authors.  Amazon is putting a stop to the abuses of the system.

Last Tuesday, an Amazon subsidiary filed in federal court seeking to confirm an arbitration award against a self-publisher alleged to have abused Kindle’s terms by “combining selections of works they had already published into purportedly new books,” a practice called book stuffing.

Source: Amazon Won Arbitration That Addresses The Six-Figure ‘Book Stuffing’ Kindle Scam

Articles, Historical Romance

Beyond Bodice-Rippers: How Romance Novels Came to Embrace Feminism

Another interesting article.

“Bodice-rippers,” the most famous term associated with the romance genre are, according to the book Beyond Heaving Bosoms: “typically set in the past, and the hero is a great deal older, more brutal, and more rapetastic than the heroine.” The heroines were young, virginal women whose purity was of paramount importance to their worth. The rapist-turned-true-love hero was a standard character.

The genre is known for promoting traditional gender roles, but a new generation of writers is challenging these conventions.

Source: Beyond Bodice-Rippers: How Romance Novels Came to Embrace Feminism

Articles, Historical Romance

Top Ten Historical Romance Authors as of March 11, 2018

One month has passed since my last list of top ten on the Kindle eBooks in the Romance >Historical Romance list.

The sands have shifted again in the vast landscape of historical romance books and the authors who write them.  In fact, the list usually changes daily.  Below is a list of the authors, with their current best-selling book.

How do authors get to the top ten?  It’s all about popularity, brand, good books, and/or exceptional marketing.  Usually when an author hits the top one hundred of any genre list, the book turns into a feeding beast multiplying sales.  The better the marketing, the higher you climb, and the more visibility you receive.  It’s a book-eat-book jungle in the world of Amazon algorithms.

Drum roll, please….we’ve done all the searching for you!

  1. Kate Quinn (Penquin Publisher) – Mistress of Rome
  2. Eleanor Meyers (Sherman Brooks Publishers) – The Legend of the Earl
  3. Bridget Barton (Independent Author) – A Damsel for the Mysterious Duke
  4. Lisa Kleypas (Avon) – Hello Stranger: The Ravenels, Book 4
  5. Ellie St. Clair (Independent Author) – He’s a Duke, But I Love Him, Happily Ever After Book 4
  6. Christi Caldwell (Independent Author) – The Lady Who Loved Him (The Brethren Book 2)
  7. Kathryn Le Veque – (Dragonblade Publishing) – Brides of Scotland (Four Medieval Scotland England)
  8. Caroline Fyffe (Montlake Romance) – True Heart’s Desire (Colorado Hearts Book 2)
  9. Kimberly Cates – (Independent Author) – Angel’s Fall (Culloden’s Fire Book 2)
  10. Mary Balogh – (Class eBook Editions, Ltd) – A Day for Love
Articles, Historical Romance

What Happened to the Historical Romance Novel?

This is a Press This! redirect to a fascinating article written in 2014 that deals with the overabundance of duke-centric historical romance novels flooding the market. Some of the blame is placed on Amazon and their algorithms.  You know how it works nowadays – you search for a couch on Google and then couches are everywhere on Pinterest, Facebook, Instagram, etc.  If you search for a Regency romance on Amazon, and you’ll get hundreds of suggestions on other Regency romances filling your pages.

The article explores the draw to dukes and the lessening of other genre eras losing popularity for a variety of reasons. In the end, though, it encourages both authors and readers there is much more out there to write about and read about when it comes to historical romance.

Read more at What Happened to the Historical Romance Novel?  on Huffington Post

Articles, Historical Romance

Global Settings for Historical Romance

When writing a book, authors are faced with decisions about what era to choose and what location to place the story. Since historical romance genre readers have their likes and dislikes, those decisions can influence sales.

If you do a quick perusal of today’s best-selling historical romance books on Amazon Kindle, the top twenty are set in the following locations: 14 – United Kingdom, 2 – France, 3 – United States.

An interesting article was published in USA Today/LIFE by By: Joyce Lamb | July 6, 2016, focusing on the fact that historical romance set outside of England can be risky business. (See Link Below)

Settings in England continue to flood the marketplace. Perhaps that is why we are drowning in dukes and other titled aristocrat-related stories. Why, however, are readers not as interested in other geographical settings? The British have apparently made such an influence on literature throughout history in their abundance of romantic poets and female authors such as Austen, Bronte, and Gaskell, that we rarely look elsewhere. Romance in England holds our fanciful interests more so than stories set in other regional settings. Perhaps it’s one place the empire continues to rule because it appears the sun never sets on the British Empire of historical romance.

The more I look at the trends of the genre, the more I become convinced readers and authors are stuck in a rut. Of course, if readers don’t support the authors who dare to cross country borders, a dramatic change in the genre may never occur.

Romance stories can be universal and not confined to one country.  It’s “a book or movie dealing with love in a sentimental or idealized way,” says the English Oxford Living Dictionary.  Nevertheless, let’s face it — there’s nothing to idealize in a story about falling in love with a farmer from 19th century Poland.  However, give us an English country estate, lavish lifestyles, a titled duke, and we’re more than ready to transport ourselves into the idealized romance of English life.

To read more about the brave authors who dare to set historicals outside of England, click on the link below.

Happy reading!

Diana Quincy, whose new historical romance, A License to Wed (Rebellious Brides No. 3), is out this week, joins us to explore the topic of setting historicals outside of England. Diana: If there’s one unwritten rule in historical romance, it’s that venturing outside of England is a risky proposition.

Source: Why setting a historical romance outside of England is risky business

Articles, Historical Romance, Writing Historical Romance

The Changing Heroines in Historical Romance

Female power. The new “alpha feminist” has arrived in the historical romance genre, becoming the new archetype of heroines presented to readers. The former heroines of eras past are now given twenty-first-century feminist empowerment by authors who are frustrated with the modern day female woes.

Should such role reversals be found only in contemporary romance or is it all right to change the facts of historical romance in order to rewrite what we dislike about a woman’s place two hundred years ago? The bodice-ripping dukes may soon be replaced by the female dominant who acts quite differently than a woman in want of a husband would have done so during the Regency or Victorian eras.

What are your thoughts about rewriting the historical aspect of historical romance to satisfy our strong female egos of the current century? Are you tired of reading about weak-willed and submissive women? Do you prefer putting period clothing on a twenty-first-century role model and ignoring the norms of the bygone days? Since staunch reviewers often chide authors that their historical romance contains modern-day dialogue, are the modern-day attitudes going to be embraced regardless of accuracy?

The growing change of empowering female characters from the past will have a huge influence on historical romance. Nevertheless, readers will gravitate toward what suits them as they read toward the happily-ever-after ending in search of romance.  It could be the typical dominant male hero that keeps your fancy or perhaps you’ll seek out the strong heroine who could care less what her place should be in the scheme of things.  Historical feminism will definitely be arriving earlier in historical romance books, according to the article below.

What are your thoughts?  Like?  Dislike?

Romance fans have long loved the genre for its unapologetic celebration of female power and sexuality. Now more and more writers are beginning to consider the ways in which their work can offer not just a happy ending, but a powerful statement.

Source: Who Gets A Happily Ever After In 2018?

Articles, Historical Romance, Top Ten Authors

Top Ten Historical Romance Authors as of February 9, 2018

Like shifting sands on a beach, so are the top-ten historical romance authors on Amazon.  Much of the move has to do with sales, of course, having pushed them upward into higher ranks.

Okay, who are the current ladies that write the stories that make you swoon prior to Valentine’s Day?  Here are the top ten authors and their most popular books as of February 2018.  It’s interesting to note that only two authors who were on our December list remain in the top ten – Christi Caldwell and Bridget Barton.  As you can see, marketing is everything.

  1. Bridget Barton – A Damsel for the Mysterious Duke, Kind Ella and the Duke, A Beauty for the Scarred Duke, A Governness for the Brooding Duke, A Bride of the Betrayed Earl. 
  2. Caroline Fyfee – Heart of Eden, True Heart’s Desire, Montana Promise, Montana Dawn, Montana Courage. 
  3. Eleanor Meyers – A New Marquess, The Son of an Earl, The Son of a Soldier, The Son of a  Marquess, To Love a Lord of London. 
  4. Tammy Andresen – Hot Winter Nights, Earl of Sussex, Taming the Duke’s Heart, Taming a Duke’s Reckless Heart, Christmastide with My Captain 
  5. Christi Caldwell – Hell and Sin, Scandalous Seasons, A Danby Novella, The Lady Who Loved Him, The Heiress’s Deception 
  6. Kathryn LeVequeHigh Warrier, Brides of the Marches, Realm of the Angels, The Legend, Godspeed 
  7. Hazel Hunter – Lachlan, Gavin, Tharaen, Evander, Tormod 
  8. Jillian Eaton – The Winter Duchess, A Dangerous Proposal, The Christmas Widow, A Dangerous Seduction, Forgotten Fiancee 
  9. Laura Landon – Brotherhood Series, Jaded Moon, Ransomed Jewels, Silent Revenge, Dark Ruby 
  10. Emma Prince – Surrender to the Scot, The Bastard Laird’s Bride, Highlander’s Redemption, The Lady’s Protector, Highlander’s Reckoning

Happy reading,
HR Admin

Articles, Historical Romance

Author Beverly Jenkins Delivers the Unexpected

IN THE NEWS – An interesting article and interview with author Beverly Jenkins.

Her latest romance novel, ‘Tempest,’ is about an African-American mail-order bride who heads to 1885 Wyoming to meet her future husband

Read More at Source: Author Beverly Jenkins delivers the unexpected

From USA Today Bestselling Author Beverly Jenkins comes a new novel in a mesmerizing series set in the Old West, where an arranged marriage becomes a grand passion . . .

What kind of mail-order bride greets her intended with a bullet instead of a kiss? One like Regan Carmichael—an independent spirit equally at home in denims and dresses. Shooting Dr. Colton Lee in the shoulder is an honest error, but soon Regan wonders if her entire plan to marry a man she’s never met is a mistake. Colton, who buried his heart along with his first wife, insists he only wants someone to care for his daughter. Yet Regan is drawn to the unmistakable desire in his gaze.

Regan’s far from the docile bride Colton was expecting. Still, few women would brave the wilds of Wyoming Territory for an uncertain future with a widower and his child. The thought of having a bold, forthright woman like Regan in his life—and in his arms—begins to inspire a new dream. And despite his family’s disapproval and an unseen enemy, he’ll risk all to make this match a real union of body and soul.

 

Articles, Historical Romance

Walmart is Teaming Up With One of the World’s Biggest E-Commerce Companies  

Walmart is diving into the business of selling ereaders, ebooks, and audiobooks through a partnership with Japanese e-commerce giant Rakuten.

Well, here is a bit of news – Walmart selling eBooks?  Sure, why not?  They can do so online and also sell Kobo eReaders, as well as romance books.  Frankly, Amazon’s domination is huge and retailers are starting to take bold moves against the big A.

“The deal will give Walmart access to the massive ebook market, which is largely dominated by Amazon. Amazon is responsible for roughly 83% of all ebook sales in the US…”

Source: Walmart is teaming up with one of the world’s biggest e-commerce companies to take direct aim at Amazon

Articles, Historical Romance

The Dark Side of Historical Romance

There is a dark side in the historical romance genre.  It’s Gothic romance, which doesn’t always give the reader a happily-ever-after ending. Born centuries ago, the genre flourished in the late 18th and 19th century England. They were dark tales, often with a supernatural backdrop, set in creepy houses, castles, or ruins. Somewhere lurking in the fearful locations were mysterious men with secrets or questionable pasts who wooed unsuspecting female heroines.  Of course, in the mix, there could be ghosts, monsters, vampires, and other evils lurking beneath the bed.

The romance, however, is still a focal point of these dark tales of love intermixed with the not-so-pleasant surroundings.  A few years ago a Gothic romance by the name of Crimson Peak hit the theatres starring Tom Hiddleston, Jessica Chastain, and Mia Wasikowska.  Below is a fairly short but great description of the Victorian sexuality that became part of Gothic romance.

 

If you have not seen the movie, you can also read the book.

After doing a bit of Google searching, I came across another good article about the genre that is worth the read – Romance Unlaced: Authors Discuss Today’s Gothic Romances by Madeline Hunter of USA Today (July 13, 2016).

Years ago, before big, fat historical romances broke onto the scene, I would look at the mass-market racks in the drugstore and see rows of covers that had much in common. A woman in a filmy gown running down a hill in the night. In the background, cast in eerie moonlight, was a big house. Read More Here

If you haven’t read a good Gothic lately, here are a few to try out mentioned in the article above.  Caution.  Not all may have HEA.

Articles, Historical Romance

Huge Changes Coming to Facebook

Today an announcement was made regarding changes coming to Facebook’s feed.  As an author and promoter of books, I regularly use Facebook to engage with fans and followers.  It helps me connect, keep my followers up-to-date on news, and is a means of promotion.  As of today, that is going to change dramatically.

Facebook is making changes to make sure that your feed will include more information from your friends and family.  Content from pages you LIKE is going to drop dramatically.  As reported in the Irish Times (which had a good article about it):  “As we roll this out, you’ll see less public content like posts from businesses, brands, and media,” wrote Zuckerberg. The implication couldn’t be clearer. All media companies that post their content on Facebook will see a decline in the number of users that they reach through the platform.  For those publishers that have built their commercial strategy around Facebook and are dependent on it for most or even all of their income, it could be ruinous.”

So what does this mean to you?  With my followers on my page for Historical Romance Books on Facebook nearing 1,000, you will see fewer posts.  I’ll probably fall into obscurity on your feed so marketing and news regarding historical romance from your favorite authors may be non-existent in your feed.

The only solution I can give you is to regularly follow the Historical-Romances.com website and subscribe to the feed of new posts and sign up for our newsletter. You can do so on our home page:  HTTPS://atomic-temporary-100180380.wpcomstaging.com If you love historical romance and the articles and news we post, this may be the only means of connecting with you on a regular basis to keep you informed on new releases, offer authors promotion, and provide great reviews.

To read more about these Facebook changes here is a good article on RECODE.  Facebook will be more focused now on personal connections than a platform for marketing.  For some, I’m sure that will be great news.  But for others, it will dramatically hinder our reach to bring to you the news on things you like.

Articles, Historical Romance

Strike a Pose for Covers – The Reclining Lovers

From the back and neck strain to the grasping duke from behind, comes the ultimate place most aristocrats are hoping to place their heroines — on their back.

After searching through the covers of past and present, this pose seems to be the least used in the variety of physical positions.  Nonetheless, it serves to take the story to a satisfying conclusion…if you get my drift.  Here are a few goodies from the past.

…and those from the present carrying on the seductive reclining position.

Articles, Historical Romance

Strike a Pose for Covers – The Backstrain

Yesterday, I was feeling a bit loopy looking at old historical romance book covers. Have you ever thought about the cover poses in this genre?  If you look at the older books, I can imagine an ensuing backache and neck strain sustained if a shirtless man bent me over backward, while I lifted my naked leg up against his side.  Romantic?  I laugh at the faces of these ladies who often turn their head away and looked pained rather than seduced.  Of course, the windstorm is always blowing and the hair is flying around.  Do they make you go ouch or moan at the thought of the dominant male seducing you as our spine cracks?

Have a bit of a chuckle with me on the first strike a pose for covers blog post.  More to come!

Has the pose diminished in current historical romance covers?  Not really.  Backs and necks are still out of line, however, it’s hard to find the consistent leg up these days.

Articles, Historical Romance

Let’s Duke it Out

BS1Let’s face it, ladies.  We are drowning in dukes!  This morning when I visited the historical romance best sellers on Amazon Kindle, that’s pretty much dominated the scene in the 100 top selling books.  Even those books that don’t have the title “duke” on the cover, doesn’t mean there isn’t one lurking between the pages.  Most of these dude dukes are bad boys with a few charming ones thrown into the mix.

Here’s a quick sampling if you don’t think I’ve gone historical romance raving mad.

Blame it on the Duke
Kind Ella and the Charming Duke
A Beauty for the Scared Duke
The Duke of Nothing
A Duke in Shining Armor
The Duke of Ruin
A Governess for the Brooding Duke
The Silent Duke
From Duke Till Dawn
The Desires of a Duke
My Wild Duke
The Lady, the Duke, and the Gentleman
Kissing the Duke
The Broken Duke…and on, and on, and on.

Once in a while, a lord, marquis, and earl sneak in the bunch, not to be confused with the many rogues of the historical romance genre.  There are even duke series like Difficult Dukes, The Disgraceful Dukes, Girl Meets Duke and many more.  I guess I’m scratching my head on why we always have to fall in love with a duke.  Is there a hidden code that only best-selling romances must be duke centric?  Is this the only peerage that can sweep us away into the fantasy land of romance?

After doing some research, I’ve found a Goodreads Listopia entitled, “Dukes…Bring ’em on!”  If you Google the term “dukes in historical romance novels,” you’ll be smacked to learn the results.  There’s an interesting article on NPR entitled, “Put Up Your Dukes: Romance’s Favorite Rank.”

Perhaps it boils down that with all these erotic romance covers, we have determined that dukes are the sexiest and most desired of the English peerage. We prefer dreaming about becoming a duchess regardless if we understand why we should address him as His Grace or where he stands in the scheme of English peerage. Whatever the reason, I’d frankly like to see more historical romances that go beyond this narrow breed of titled men and even dare to focus on a man without an aristocratic title.

What are your thoughts, readers?  Don’t be shy!  Start chiming in and enjoy the discussion.

Your Admin from Historical Romance Books

P.S. If you want to learn about British peerage, here is a good article on Anglotopia, “The peerage: A primer on Understanding Lords, Ladies, Dukes, Earls and More.”

Articles, Historical Romance

Self-Publishing Success Story: Collette Cameron, USA Today Bestselling Historical Romance Author

A great article from Alliance of Independent Authors.

“In our interview with USA Today bestselling romance author, Collette Cameron shares some great ideas for how to achieve self-publishing success as she has done.”

SOURCE:  https://selfpublishingadvice.org/self-publishing-success-collette-cameron/

Find her latest release on Amazon.

 

Articles, Historical Romance

The 10 Best Romance Novels of 2017

Entertainment Weekly has spoken. Here are the best in Historical Romance novels this past year all from traditional publishers.

Do you agree?

4.4 Amazon Rating – Released by Kensington March 28, 2017

 

4.7 Amazon Rating – Released by Avon Books August 22, 2017
4.4 Amazon Rating – Released by Avon Books January 31, 2017

 

4.2 Amazon Rating – Rel;eased by Avon June 27, 2017

View the link for the entire list.

Source: The 10 best romance novels of 2017

Articles, Historical Romance

What Makes a Great Historical Romance?

If you ever get to know me personally, you will soon find out that I love to analyze just about anything.  My quest for the day is what makes a great historical romance book?

To answer that question, I turned toward one-star reviews left for books written by famous historical romance authors from the big publishers. You would think I’d be reading the five stars instead, but what is lacking in historical romance stories has my interest piqued. Here are the top-ten complaints I discovered.

Predictable Plot.  Supposedly, these are books where you already know how it’s going to end after reading a few chapters.  In other words, there isn’t a plot twist or anything else interesting in between boy meets girl and the happily ever after.  The story is supposed to reach a climax point (not the other kind of climax, ladies) before reaching the satisfying end.

Contrived Plot.  I’ve seen contrived plots on television but what’s the definition and why does it irk readers?  Frankly, there is an excess of comments if you Google the term.  They apparently stretch plausibility, such as setting up situations that are unbelievable and deliberate.  Other thoughts are that contrived plots are forced and unnatural.

No Tension – No Sizzle.  Well, this one is obvious.  Hero and heroine are a dud.  Is sexual tension always the spice of the story?  Of course, how can you believe the love if there isn’t any sizzle?

Too Much Sex or Not Enough Sex.  There doesn’t seem to be a happy medium when it comes to this complaint.  There either isn’t enough sex or there is too much sex.  I suppose a story should come in between the sheets somewhere.

Dialogue – Boy, this one rampant, of course.  Historical romances with too many modern statements don’t go over very well.  Authors must write Regency-speak or Victorian-speak, regardless if we actually lived in those eras. However, I question whether every historical romance needs to sound like Jane Austen’s writing or Charlotte Bronte’s prose.

It’s a Ghost -This is an interesting complaint aimed at well-known authors who have released multiple books. Statements like, “Makes me wonder who actually wrote it.”  “What have you done with the author?” “Someone else must have written this book.” Do you think long careers make some authors fizzle out? Do they rehash plot lines and run out of inspiration?  Food for thought.

Boring.  It’s either a boring story or boring writing.  The boring story is an obvious one — nothing to keep the reader interested in continuing the book.  Another common complaint that arises are scenes that are too descriptive. How long does it take to describe a person, a room, landscape, or even a sex scene? Too much is often termed writer’s fluff.

Poor Editing.  Surprisingly, these comments are not for independent authors.  There are plenty aimed at large traditional publishing houses.  It makes me wonder how much author support has been cut back due to financial reasons. An odd style that drives me absolutely bonkers is no quotation marks for dialogue.  And don’t get me started on sentences that start with “and” and the lack of the Oxford comma.

Unlikable Characters.  This brings me back to what is a likable hero or heroine?  Check out my former posts.  There are some personality types readers do not like in their books.

No Character Development.  Characters are made of cardboard or are fully formed.  Character development is a hot topic but also a difficult one to pinpoint.  Of course, characters need flaws, positive traits, and growth.

In conclusion, everyone reacts differently to a book.  It’s interesting to read polarized positions of the same novel, making you scratch your head if they read the same story.

As always, chime in!  What are your complaints?  I love to hear from our followers.

Your Admin for Historical Romance Books

 

Articles, Historical Romance

Different Flavors of Authors

Untitled designSo who are these women (and occasional males) that write historical romance novels?  As a reader, if you haven’t been following the ever-changing landscape in the publishing world, authors come in a variety pack.  From young to old, these are the people who pen your stories that you rate from one to five stars.  We all have favorite sub-genres.  We all have favorite eras.  We all have the likable type of hero and heroine.  However, with such a variety of authors, it may be hard to weed through the inundated market of romance these days.

The Traditional

These are the ones who have chosen the traditional publishing world.  They traveled the rough trail of submissions and rejections and paid their dues.  They were proficient in writing great query letters to hook agents. Others were persistent, knocking on doors of publishers that accept direct submissions.  Whatever gateway they have been fortunate enough to open, it has provided them support from big-named publishers and smaller publishing houses on the road to release. These authors have a unique experience with their publishers who do it all – editing, cover design, distribution, in addition to bearing the majority of costs associated with publishing a book.

The Indie

Once coined the vanity writers, self-published authors or “indies” as many call them, are an entirely different breed.  At first, they came out of the gate with a less than warm welcome or reputation, often coined as the slush pile rejects or wood-be, mediocre writers.  However, as the years have passed, the indies have taken over a large portion of the market, including reaching the USA Today and NYT best-seller lists. They have gained great strides in gaining respect and earnings. Supposedly, indies are control freaks. They enjoy full engagement in their artistic endeavors.  The smart ones seek out good editors to tone their content and talented graphic artists to do their covers. It’s a learning experience in ISBN’s, eBook formatting, printing, distribution, marketing, etc., because they immerse themselves in the publishing world in order to succeed.  They are the independent ones who bear the cost of getting their books into print.

The Hybrid

What in the world is a hybrid?  No, it’s not a new dinosaur about to hatch that will grow up to eat you or your book.  It’s an author who enjoys both worlds – the traditional and the self-published.    It’s a path that some individuals pursue in a variety of ways.  It’s not unusual for a traditionally published author to take a book when the rights have reverted back to her or him and self-published it afterward.  Frankly, it’s a sweet spot for many because they are well known as traditional authors who already have a fan base.  However, this route may take negotiation because some publishers insist on a non-compete clause that prevents authors from self-publishing while under contract.

In the end, I like to think that all three author varieties have one common goal — to spread the romance together.  At Historical Romance Books, whatever path to print you have chosen, you are welcome on our pages.

Historical Romance Books Admin

 

 

 

 

Historical Romance, New Releases

Once Upon a Christmas Eve by Elizabeth Hoyt

Once Upon A ChristmasAdam Rutledge, Viscount d’Arque, really rather loathes Christmas. The banal cheerfulness. The asinine party games. And, worst of all, the obligatory trip to the countryside. His grandmother, however, loves the holiday—and Adam loves his grandmother, so he’ll brave the fiercest snowstorm to please her. But when their carriage wheel snaps, they’re forced to seek shelter at the home of the most maddening, infuriating, and utterly beguiling woman he’s ever met . . .

Release Date December 5, 2017

Hachette Book Group

 

buy-button-amazon

 

 

Articles, Historical Romance

For November, A Romance Trio For ‘Hamilton’ Fans (And The Rest Of You, Too)

Historical Romance News!

Even if you haven’t seen the musical, you can keep warm this November with a delightful trio of novellas set in and around the battalion commanded by Alexander Hamilton at the siege of Yorktown.

Source: For November, A Romance Trio For ‘Hamilton’ Fans (And The Rest Of You, Too)