Do you agree with their choice? Chime in on the comments and post your best Regency Romance Novels.


Get your TBR list ready. These are 15 of the best regency romance novels, which range in content from squeaky-clean to filthily explicit.

Source: Corsets and Carriages: 15 Must-Read Regency Romance Novels

UPDATE:  As of late 2019, Amazon ceased listing authors in popularity.

As Amazon states, the most popular author list is updated hourly.  So who are the reigning queens of the pen this time?  Some of the regulars remain, while some new releases have pushed others back up the ladder.  Here they are with their most popular books:

  1. Caroline Fyffe (Heart of Mine)
  2. Dragonblade Publishing (This is a collection of various authors – The Wicked Baron by Mary Lancaster leads the group.)
  3. Amy Harmon (What the Wind Knows)
  4. Christi Caldwell (The Governess)
  5. Samantha Holt (Once a Wallflower, Always a Wallflower)
  6. Kathryn Le Veque (The Mountain Dark)
  7. Lisa Kleypas (Devil’s Daughter)
  8. Mary Balogh (Second Chances)
  9. Ann Lethbridge (No Regrets)
  10. Alexa Aston (The Heir)

Occasionally, I read other books but not often.  The reason is that I don’t want to be influenced in my own writing with the words or thoughts of other authors.  With all of the plagiarism going on at the moment, I think that is a safe practice.  It was probably a good thing that I did read it.  It was offered as an Amazon first read so I downloaded.  You can see my reason in the last paragraph below.

What the Wind Knows takes readers back in time to 1920’s Ireland. It’s a time-travel trope where the heroine disappears in the fog on a lake in Ireland while spreading her grandfather’s ashes after his death. No stones like Outlander. No time machine from 2001. No wonky portals. Just a rowboat and fog on the lough.

Anne takes a trip through time and arrives in a rather violent welcome to the time period when her grandfather was a young child. Because of the close resemblance, her family and their friends instantly think that she is her grandfather’s mother, who disappeared years earlier. The book is set in the turbulent times of Ireland, wanting to break free from British rule and is filled with a historical backdrop that may be interesting to read but often takes away from the romance in the story.

Amy Harmon is a well-known writer, whose prose is very wordy. I’m more of a get to the point type of reader and writer, who gets bogged down in unnecessary flowery words. Such prose is beautiful to some readers. Frankly, it’s my personal preference not to drown in letters, so my comment is not meant to be a judgmental rant but rather a personal preference.

With a bit of Irish in me on my fourth-great grandfather’s line, I’ve never immersed myself in Irish history.  I am well aware and have watched other television shows about Easter Monday, April 24, 1916, and what occurred.  Therefore, the backdrop timeline was familiar but of little interest to me. Nevertheless, I found the romance between Anne and Thomas sweet in its own right. The fact that he eventually comes to the realization that she is not of his time is a long journey to acceptance. I guessed the antagonist twist long before the reveal (my author plot brain) and thought the ending probably made for another path to a sequel if that’s the author’s intent.

I will add that nothing is new under the sun in many ways when ideas pop into an author’s head. You’ll find similarities in this story with other time-travel storylines such as Outlander.  Amy Harmon wrote this book because of her Irish heritage.  To my gasping horror, the premise is very similar to an unfinished book of my own, time traveling back to my ancestor’s lives, falling in love with a family character, returning to my time, and my lover eventually following through that mysterious portal to live with me happily ever after.  To add to the problem, my main character is an author as well, just as Amy Harmon made her Anne a best-selling author in What the Wind Knows.  Unfortunately, now I’ll probably need to dump my idea and rethink the plot thanks to Amy who apparently was on the same wavelength with my muse.  Of course, she’s a NY Times bestselling traditionally published author, while I, on the other hand, live in the obscurity of the indie world.

It’s a good read, especially if you’re Irish and love the time-traveling trope.  I recommend it in spite of my slight negativity and disappointment that my own book just got trashed.

Amazon Logo

For authors and readers alike. Well worth the read.

This is a post about authenticity and craft vs. fraud and plagiarism, but it’s not a moral tirade. You can look elsewhere for that. The reason I don’t want to point fingers or make ulti…

Source: Can you ever forgive me? Fraud and plagiarism in the publishing industry – Creativindie

Do book mills exist?  Do ghostwriters crank out books for people who aren’t authors?  You betcha.  Perhaps you’ve unknowingly read a few from prolific so-called authors releasing works one after another. Frankly, I’ve wondered myself when authors have more than one book a month hitting the stands.

Click the link below to read a good blog post from another author and be informed. It’s all about money.

Because of the recent plagiarism scandal, there is a new cry from authors who actually write their own words.  You’ll probably see this statement cropping up on more author websites and social media pages.

“I write my own f***** books.”

#CopyPasteCris

Source: We’re Missing Something Big in this Cristiane Serruya Story — KILBY BLADES

I’m very sorry to report that many authors, some of whom you may have read, are victims of plagiarism.  You can read about Courtney Milan’s horrible experience HERE.

The romance community takes infringement very seriously, and it’s a sad day when authors spend hours writing original works only to have large portions stolen and rewritten in books that are sold to unsuspecting readers.  It’s even worse when the alleged thief makes the USA Today bestseller list, enjoying its fame, with words not written by her hand.

Please read these articles, and do not support the individual involved in this thief of intellectual property.  Some of the historical romance authors who have had their works plagiarized include Courtney Milan,  Christi Caldwell, Tessa Dare, Loretta Chase, and other contemporary romance authors.

Read more in the article below:

 

Your need-to-know information about the #CopyPasteCris hashtag born after romance author Courtney Milan discovered that her work was plagiarized by another.

Source: Romancelandia, Intellectual Property, and Plagiarism: A Round-Up of #CopyPasteCris

A long dead 19th century author who wrote about the rather limited lives of women, in a time when success was defined by who you married, might seem a strange crush for the modern millennial, yet on Instagram the hashtag ‘#janeausten’ brings up over half a million hits and counting.

                 Source: Jane Austen: Why do Millennials Love her so Much?

Have you read the book, North & South, by Elizabeth Gaskell? I encourage you to take the opportunity. A few years ago, I had the privilege of visiting Elizabeth’s home in Manchester, United Kingdom. It was the highlight of my trip. To see pictures of her home and life, visit my blog on my author website. I even pushed the doorbell once touched by Charlotte Bronte and Charles Dickens.  Here’s a good article about the on-screen version.

“It’s one of the most explosive, chemistry-rich misunderstanding-laden romances that’s ever graced the small screen.”

Read More:

Source: 10 Years Later, ‘North & South’ Remains the Greatest Period-Drama Miniseries of All Time – Flavorwire

It’s my Classic reading challenge!  Read North & South.

Not Colin Firth – Not Matthew Macfayden or any other.  Here’s an interesting take on what Mr. Darcy would have really looked like. Read more below.

Mr. Darcy, Jane Austen’s swoon-worthy, 18th-century aristocratic hero, has a sizzle that transcends time.  A team of experts on fashion and social culture offer their take on Jane Austen’s brooding hero.

Source: Meet the Historically Accurate Mr. Darcy | Smart News | Smithsonian

“Mr. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien; and the report which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand [pounds] a year.”

UPDATE:  These posts were both informative and fun to do.  But, alas.  Amazon decided to do away with the lists of top authors in various genres in 2019.  If it ever comes back, I’ll start posting them again.

It’s a new day; it’s a new year.  So who is holding the top ten spot for historical romance authors?  Well, here’s the list, and interesting enough, there is a lot of crossover at the moment between true historical romance versus historical fiction.

By Diana Gabaldon’s own admission, her books are not historical romance.  Philippa Gregory is in the number two spot, and she’s definitely historical fiction. How do they get there? Well, when books are loaded for sale into Amazon, publishers and authors can choose two categories to list their books.  Most who write historical romance also choose historical fiction and sometimes other categories.

A few of the names are regulars in the top ten, such as Kathyrn Le Veque and Christi Caldwell, but an old favorite has made it this time around – Jane Austen.  I wonder what she would think about being in the top ten over two hundred years later?

Here are your top ten for January 1, 2019.

  1. Diana Gabaldon
  2. Philippa Gregory
  3. Fiona Valpy
  4. Sally Britton
  5. Dragonblade Publishing (Various Authors)
  6. Kathryn Le Veque
  7. Christi Caldwell
  8. Natasha Lester
  9. Jane Austen
  10. Scarlett Scott

Below is a sample of their most popular books.