Soul Mate Publishing Synopsis It’s a risk of a lifetime loving a man you’re supposed to hate… Betrayed by a brother she hardly trusted before the bloodthirsty Viking, Jarl Randvior Sigurdsson, attacks her home, Noelle Sinclair is conveniently bartered as a means to save her cowardly sibling’s skin. Forced to leave her homeland and accompany the petulant Viking to the untamed wilderness of central Norway, Noelle is ever-aware of the burgeoning dangers around her—including her weakening resolve to resist Randvior. Should Noelle surrender to his resplendent charms and seduction, or fight with every ounce of strength she possesses to get home? Excerpt Dark clouds always gathered in Noelle Sinclair’s dreams. Hundreds of nightmares had played out in her mind since childhood. Why should tonight beContinue Reading

Many things attracted me to Vikings. I’ve been in love with history forever. As a highly imaginative child, prone to telling tall tales, reading and writing came naturally. Of course what I read and wrote is another story. It started with sneaking peeks at my eldest brother’s collection of Conan the Barbarian comic books and developed into a full blown obsession with heroes. What’s more compelling than a warrior’s tale? I can’t think of anything I like more. Combine romance, action, and a touch of mysticism and I’m hooked—in a big way. Lacking any central authority during the early raids, Norsemen seized this opportunity and often returned from pillaging in glory and wealthier than they ever dreamed. Commoners became princes, men of reputation and honor.Continue Reading

Ellora’s Cave Released 7-17-13 Synopsis: Legend is Grim Hammerhand is half wolf. Vowing never to marry, the muscular, red-haired warrior saves his passion for the battlefield and the forge. That is, until the woman he secretly lusts after is abducted. Asgerd has loved Grim for years, only to be ignored by the object of her desire. She has eluded the bonds of marriage, hoping that someday Grim will notice her, but her dreams are shattered when she is captured and defiled by the brutal warrior Stein. After the king sends Grim to rescue his daughter and claim Stein’s land, the passion between the couple finally ignites. In the end, Grim’s mistrust of all women could destroy their one true chance for happiness.Continue Reading

Entangled Publishing, LLC Released 6-10-13 70,000 Words Synopsis: A stolen woman of rare qualities… AD 1022…Helena longs for freedom. The Frankish maid wasn’t born a slave but marauding Danes have taken her. She’s desperate to escape their camp. Her savior comes as a fierce Norse chieftain, Hakan, who takes her to the far, icy north. A powerful warrior who’s lived by the sword… Hakan wants to lay down his sword and live a peaceful farmer’s life. Betrayal has left him cold to other women, yet his heart thaws to clever Helena. Her tender ways lure him, weaving kindness into his hard life. But, happiness is short lived. Old loyalties and deceit vex the warrior, calling upon his sword arm. A clash of cultures amidst aContinue Reading

Synopsis Charles Huntley, Lord Ryevale, infamous rogue…and government agent. In unsettled times, with England at war with France, Ryevale is assigned to covertly protect a politician’s daughter, Miss Verity Verrinder. To keep Verity under his watchful eye, Ryevale plots a campaign of seduction that no woman can resist– except it seems, Miss Verrinder. In order to gain her trust Ryevale enters Verity’s world of charity meetings and bookshops…where the unexpected happens and he falls in love with his charge. When Lord Ryevale turns his bone-melting charms on her, Verity questions his lordship’s motivation. But with her controlling father abroad, Verity wishes to explore London and reluctantly accepts Ryevale’s companionship. As the compelling attraction between them strengthens, Verity is shattered to learn her instincts are correctContinue Reading

Synopsis: Mathilda Hardwicke, a rebellious artist rejected by her family and New York society, heads west to Gold Rush California as a mail-order bride. But when fate leaves her alone at the altar, she’s drawn to Sakote–a fierce Konkow warrior whose tribe is threatened by the encroaching white men–in whose arms she discovers a savage new Paradise and a forbidden love more precious than gold. Purchase Links:  Kindle|Nook| Kobo| Trade-Size Paperback Author links: Website | Facebook | Twitter | PinterestContinue Reading

While writing my award-winning novel, Dark Persuasion, I spent a fair amount of time researching Victorian courting, wedding preparations, weddings, and honeymoons.  The entire process felt so romantic to me that I focused quite a bit on the wedding between my heroine and hero. Below are a few excerpts from previous blogs that I’ve written regarding that research.  I hope you enjoy! The Wedding Trousseau The French word trousseau refers, of course, to a bride’s bundle of personal possessions amassed prior to the wedding that include undergarments and clothing. Late in the 19th and early 20th century, a collection of household wares (tablecloths, towels, linens, etc.) were also included. Below is an excerpt from Vintage Connection describing a typical trousseau around 1884. It would includeContinue Reading

The Tudor court was rife with politics and power-play – and never more so than in the bedroom. Being a gentleman of the King’s bedchamber, meant intimate contact with the monarch – and so only the most privileged and trusted were admitted to the position. This was a reflection of the closeness to the monarch’s ear and possible influence on government policy.   Keys to the bedchamber became a symbol of power. That most intimate of servants, The Groom of the Stool (the stool referred to is the Tudor equivalent of the toilet) wore as a badge of office ‘a gold key on a blue ribbon’ – and had to authority to demand that ‘no other keys for the bed-chamber be made or allowed.’ EvenContinue Reading

They say men are stimulated visually.  It’s not what they hear whispered in their ears – it’s what they see with their eyes that move them toward sex and romance.  For the most part, I do think that men are wired that way.  However, when it comes to reading steamy historical romance novels, women are not only moved by the story, but by the covers that give us a glimpse of the hero and heroine. The historical romance genre bombards readers with bare-chested, muscular males, who have shirts falling off their backs, toned physiques, and six-pack abs. The heroines are women with unbuttoned or unlaced dresses in the back, overflowing breasts from low necklines, and passionate scenes of kissing in provocative poses.  They set theContinue Reading

Romance Writer’s of America gives guidelines as to what constitutes the genre of “Romance” and the many sub-genres that go along with it.  It’s basically two points, and I quote:  A central love story and an emotionally-satisfying and optimistic ending.  You get the drift.  Boy meets girl.  They fall in love.  Have a few obstacles along the way, and live happily ever after.  What about historical fiction with romantic elements?  Are they worth the read too?  If you’re willing to take the “central love story” but not kill the author for the ending, they can be a satisfying read. Not all historical fiction books have happy or optimistic endings. Stories of kings and queens and the people they loved were largely influenced by their inheritedContinue Reading

The Dashwood Sisters.  Could there be anything more entertaining than these two women?  They are as different as night and day and both on a pursuit for husbands. Elinor bears everything with quiet decorum and sense. Marianne is outspoken and seeks the thrills of romantic fellowship with no sense at all. Okay, I’ll confess.  Sense and Sensibility is my favorite of Austen’s works. It was her first novel written in 1795 at the age of 19 and was accepted by a publisher and put into print in 1811 (at her own expense, I might add for all you indies out there).  Though I’m not an Austen expert by any means, I’m thankful for the many resources available online about her life and works from peopleContinue Reading

There’s nothing like starting a book off quickly and to the point. Sarah Ladd does just that in this Regency tale of one woman’s intent on marriage. In fact, she’s so driven to do so, the heroine proposes matrimony to a man she meets for the first time at the end of chapter one. Of course, a woman should have good motives to do something so outrageous in 1814. In Amelia’s mind, she thinks her plan is perfect. It will secure her inheritance and provide an instant family with a man she barely knows.  Captain Sterling has returned home to face the sorrows and joys of the life he left behind on his latest tour of duty. Amelia is a head-strong woman with a mindContinue Reading

I’m happy to report that we are registered with six book tour sites.  It is disappointing to see the lack of historical romances being promoted.  :wipes away tear:  I have put in for one novel for promo for the end of July. Of course, we have authors contacting us directly as well. Our reviewers are going to begin picking up titles on their own. If I can squeeze it in, I’m curious to read The Heiress of Winterwood. I’ve been working on our Goodreads page, too, and visiting groups, collecting friends, and telling authors about our site.  While I was clicking from here to there, I glanced at my one lonely quote I had tagged on my page spoken by Marianne in the movie SenseContinue Reading

Fitzwilliam Darcy. When he was conceived by Jane Austen and read by women everywhere before movies came along, I wonder how he was pictured in the minds of ladies. Of course, I’m sure that propriety forbade them to speak openly of such private imaginations. Well, let’s face it, as Jane said, a “lady’s imagination is very rapid” and who knows where it will lead besides matrimony. As modern women, we are blessed with the advent of movies that have cast Darcy in the bodies of handsome actors. It’s here in our 21st century world when we read Pride & Prejudice, we’re no doubt picturing one of these men wearing a cravat and looking quite dashing in their period clothing. I think it’s safe to sayContinue Reading

Fashion in France 1908 I’m in love with outrageously large hats from long ago.  I’ve been watching Mr. Selfridge on Masterpiece Theater recently.  I’m enthralled with Lady Mae wearing her fashionable dresses and hats of early 1900’s.   In my book The Price of Deception, I had a few passages about hats. “Robert curiously viewed his wife as she donned her latest flashy, Parisian monstrosity on her head.”  I also mentioned that his mother became overly excited when her daughter-in-law brought a gift back from Paris. Jacquelyn hugged her mother-in-law tightly and immediately brought her attention to the newest purchase perched upon her head. She twirled around and flashed a smile. “What do you think? Isn’t it gorgeous?”  Mary gave the purple silk, netting, lace, feathers,Continue Reading

I, take thee, to be my lawful wedded wife, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part, according to God’s holy ordinance; and thereto I plight thee my troth. Sounds like a fairytale, doesn’t it?  Historical romance authors, if they follow the rules, end books in similar ways giving the “HEA” ending to readers.  Who wants to read about divorce in a romance novel?  However, I’m a diehard researcher that always has to look at a situation from every angle, so I took the time to discover the truth about marriage and divorce. My research regarding divorce laws in France and EnglandContinue Reading

As readers of historical romance, we probably all have our favorite eras that we love to read about.  For me, it is the late Victorian era up through the Edwardian era (1870 to 1910).  I’m fascinated mostly because of the fashions, etiquette, and way of life of the upper class.  Though I’ve written about the struggles of the poor and some of the unseemly points of existence during those years, I guess like most other readers I’d rather bask in the class of privilege. However, one era that draws readers of historical romance is the Middle Ages, where we are surrounded by knights in shining armor.  When I think of that time, I instantly think of Lancelot, that cute Frenchman that stole the heart ofContinue Reading

What a loaded question that happened to be on the Internet today.  A blog post was contributed by Jane Litte, the founder of Dear Author entitled, “We Should Let the Historical Romance Genre Die.”  A flash flood of comments were posted either agreeing or rebutting the idea.  The article was re-posted on one of my favorite sites, The Passive Voice, which generated many comments as well. It was a hot topic between readers and writers whether our Mr. Darcy-type characters are doomed to fade away into the distant past. I commented on The Passive Voice that I don’t think the genre will ever really die, though the interest may wane because of the current trends in the marketplace. The vampire rage has paled, being replacedContinue Reading

One of my goals of this blog is not only to showcase books to readers, but to make an interactive location for authors and readers to enjoy the past that we write and read about.  I’m a firm believer in using visuals for inspiration.  My favorite practice is to make storyboards for my books.  Perhaps one day I’ll share those with you. In 2010 and 2011, I had the opportunity to live my dream of traveling to England and losing myself in the wonderful city of London.  My ancestors on my mother side are English and on my father’s Russian.  I often say it makes a lethal combination as a writer, because most of my stories have drama and tragedy before the happy ending arrives! Continue Reading

The Appropriate Use of You-Know-What, You-Know-Where and You-Know-How   This post was contributed by Lorraine Hunt Lynn on 5/5/13   Perhaps I’m a little odd, but I have a thing about hygiene in Historical Romance. Whenever the captain of a buccaneering vessel sweeps his love interest into his arms and carries her into his cabin, I tend to wonder when he (or she) last washed. I know, I know; we are supposed to presume that our protagonist and love interest have taken care of the essentials, but the question of love’s bare necessities remains for me.   Perhaps my obsession comes as a result of the years I spent studying history, and the need to understand it at its contextual level. As a student, IContinue Reading